Is there in you an entity which you call the ‘I’ or the ‘mind’ or the ‘self’? Is there a co-ordinator who is co-ordinating what you are looking at with what you are listening to, what you are smelling with what you are tasting, and so on? Or is there anything which links together the various sensations originating from a single sense—the flow of impulses from the eyes, for example? Actually, there is always a gap between any two sensations. The co-ordinator bridges that gap: he establishes himself as an illusion of continuity.

Uppaluri Gopala Krishnamurti

Born: July 9, 1918

Died: March 22, 2007 (Age 88)

Uppaluri Gopala Krishnamurti, known as U. G. Krishnamurti, was an Indian philosopher who questioned enlightenment. Although many considered him an “enlightened” person, Krishnamurti often referred to his state of being as the “natural state.” He claimed that the demand for enlightenment was the only thing standing in the way of enlightenment itself, if enlightenment existed at all.

He rejected the very basis of thought and in doing so negated all systems of thought and knowledge. Hence he explained his assertions were experiential and not speculative – “Tell them that there is nothing to understand.”

Available Documents: 2

The Mystique of Enlightenment
Book
1982
3
464
Here is perhaps the most straightforward, no-nonsense book yet written about that truth which many 'spiritual seekers' are seeking - what most gurus call 'enlightenment', and what U.G. Krishnamurti calls the 'natural state'. U.G. maintains, in this selection from his conversations, that 'so-called enlightenment' is a purely biological phenomenon, that only when we are completely free of culture, conditioning, religious thinking and intellect, can the body, with its own 'extraordinary intelligence', free the human being to be in the natural state. U.G. has been living in this state since the experience he calls the "calamity" happened to him in Switzerland on his 49th birthday. He has since become widely known, both in Europe and in India, as one who speaks with authority on the subject. U.G.'s 'talks' are informal and take place wherever he happens to be. He is no relation to J. Krishnamurti, the famous spiritual leader, whose teachings he once admired, and now considers 'archaic hogwash'. He is probably the most controversial of all the experts in such matters, gurus or non-gurus. He has been called 'outrageous', 'infuriating,' and a 'prophet of anti-wisdom'.
The Natural State, Part IV
Lecture
Unknown
8,734
42:28
1
169



464
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